Results tagged ‘ Astros ’

Springer placed on DL with right quad strain

The Astros placed outfielder George Springer on the 15-day disabled list Wednesday with a right quad strain. Marc Krauss has been recalled from Triple-A Oklahoma City to take Springer’s spot on the roster.

Springer didn’t play on Sunday in Chicago or in Tuesday’s series opener against the A’s because of what he described as “overall discomfort” in his right knee/quadriceps area. Astros manager Bo Porter said prior to Tuesday’s game Springer wasn’t to the point where he needed to go on the disabled list, but things obviously changed.

The Astros were already short-handed in the outfield with Dexter Fowler and Alex Presley both on the DL, but Krauss can play right field and left field as well as first base. Springer is hitting .231 with 20 homers and 51 RBIs through 78 games in his rookie season, putting him one homer shy of Lance Berkman’s club rookie record. He’s also struck out 114 times in 295 at-bats.

Krauss hit .173 with four homers and 13 RBIs in 39 games with the Astros earlier this year.

 

 

 

Springer out of Astros’ lineup again

Astros rookie outfielder George Springer was out of the lineup for a second consecutive game Tuesday with soreness in his right knee/quadriceps area.

Springer, who hit his 20th homer Saturday and didn’t play in Sunday’s series finale against the White Sox, did some baseball drills prior to Tuesday’s series opener at O.co Coliseum to test the leg and still had enough discomfort that didn’t allow him to play.

“I went out and did some stuff and just got some discomfort and we’ll take it from there,” Springer said.

When asked if was his knee or quad that was bothering him more, Springer said it was “overall discomfort.” He wasn’t sure when he would be able return to action, but as of now the situation doesn’t appear to warrant a stint on the disabled list.

“I don’t have a clue,” he said. “I just got to get through it and see what happens.”

Astros manager Bo Porter waited until Springer finished working out with the trainers before filling out his lineup, which again had Enrique Hernandez in center field.

“We wanted to allow him to get treatment and the training staff brought him out and went through some drills, and we went through some running and feel if he’s not able to go full speed without having discomfort, we don’t want to take any chances of it getting worse or him blowing his quad or doing something where we’re dealing with an injury that will take much longer to heal than where we’re at right now,” he said.

Porter said the DL currently isn’t an option.

“As time goes on, the information we get each and every day will allow us to make that decision as we move forward,” he said. “When you look at the 15-day DL, you have to ask yourself, ‘Is he not going to play within the next 15 days?’ and we’re not at that point right now.”

Cosart expects to be on innings limit

Sunday was right-hander Jarred Cosart’s scheduled day to pitch, but the Astros choose to start Brad Peacock and give Cosart some extra rest. He’s thrown 105 2/3 innings in the first half, which puts him on pace to best his personal high of 153 set last year between Triple-A Oklahoma City and the Astros.

Cosart’s arm feels fine, but he said general manager Jeff Luhnow indicated to him his workload would increase by 20 percent each season until he reaches 200 innings. That means he could be shut down around 183 2/3 innings this year.

“When I first came over here, Jeff said they were going to do a 20-percent increase in my innings every year until I got to 200,” Cosart said. “By that time, I’ll have a couple of years under my belt and hopefully we’ll be fighting for a playoff spot, so my innings won’t really matter. They didn’t tell me an exact number [of innings], but if you go off 20 percent of last year, it would be right around [190].”

Cosart was shut down last Sept. 9 after throwing 60 innings in 10 starts in his debut with the Astros. He had thrown 93 at Triple-A Oklahoma City.

“That’s tough to have to sit and watch for about a month,” Cosart said. “I’ll take missing one now. I’m not hurt or anything like that, so I support the decision. I know I have a 190-innings limit, so if I average five or six a start I’m going to be cutting it close at the end of the year anyway.”

Hernandez makes good impression

Astros manager Bo Porter is going with the hot hand, keeping rookie Enrique Hernandez in the starting lineup at shortstop for the second game in a row Saturday. Hernandez had three hits Friday and made a pair of outstanding defensive plays, probably saving at least three runs.

“He’s been playing really well,” Porter said. “You look at the way he played defensively yesterday, the way he played defensively in left field a couple of days ago and he continues to swing the bat well. He’s been a great addition to our ballclub.”

The Major League staff is still trying to get a feel for Hernandez, who wasn’t in big league camp. He made his Major League debut Wednesday and had an RBI double in his first at-bat, and then hit a homer Wednesday. He entered Saturday with six hits in 12 at-bats. Defensively, the 22-year-o.ld Hernandez ran down a ball in center to end the first inning Friday to strand the bases loaded, and he started a terrific double play in the hole to end the fifth. And he showed great arm strength, throwing out a runner from his knees.

“Defensively, I never quit on a ball,” he said. “I’m just going to go until someone calls me off, I catch the ball or the ball drops.”

Porter admitted Hernandez has been a spark to the team, though they’ve yet to win since he’s been up. Hernandez was drafted out of Puerto Rico in the sixth round in 2009.

“He’s definitely brought a spark to the team,” Porter said. “Again, it’s refreshing to see a guy rewarded for just performing at each and every level. He wasn’t in big league camp, so it’s not like the Major League staff had an opportunity to work with him or know him. He basically knocked the door down and played his way here and is continuing to knock down the door and play his way into the lineup. I like to see stories like that.”

Astros to be active internationally

Astros director of international Oz Ocampo will be in Venezuela on Wednesday for the start of the July 2 international signing period. He will then head to the Dominican Republic with hopes of signing some young talent, general manager Jeff Luhnow said.

The Astros once again have the largest pool of money to spend internationally at $5,015,400, and Luhnow says his club plans to be “reasonably aggressive.”

Colleague Jesse Sanchez has story about what to expect during the international signing period, as well as a list of Top 30 prospects.

“We’re hoping he comes back from both of those locations with agreements with several of what we believe will be the top players in this year’s class,” Luhnow said. “It’s a good class. It’s deep and has got pitchers, position players. I’m excited about it. I think we’re going to add a lot of depth to our system this year.”

A 16-year-old international player is eligible to sign with a Major League team between July 2 through June 15 of next year if the prospect turns 17 before Sept. 1 of this year or by the completion of his first Minor League season. Additionally, any prospect who is already 17 or older and has not previously signed a Major or Minor League contract, resides outside the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico and has not been enrolled in a high school or college in the U.S., Canada or Puerto Rico within the previous year is eligible to sign during the period.

There are also specific signing guidelines each team must follow, including penalties for exceeding spending limits.

Luhnow said offers will be made beginning Wednesday and agreements could be reached quickly in what has been described previously as a free-for-all.

“Once you sign them, it’s a matter of submitting it to Major League Baseball,” Luhnow said. “There are some kids that can’t sign until they turn 16 and that would be in later July or August, for the most part. The ones that are 16, you’ll see a lot of the top guys signed on July 2 or July 3 or right around then. We plan to be a part of that this year.”

Santana, Hernandez, Chapman on way up

The Astros are preparing to call up slugging outfield prospect Domingo Santana, along with infielder Enrique Hernandez and left-handed reliever Kevin Chapman, a baseball source told MLB.com early Tuesday.

The arrival of Santana would be the third top prospect the Astros have called up since mid-April, joining outfielder George Springer and first baseman Jonathan Singleton. Santana is rated by MLB.com as the organization’s No. 7-rated prospect.

The Astros optioned Jonathan Villar to Triple-A following Monday’s game, so Hernandez would take his place on the roster. It’s unclear what other roster moves would be made to accommodate Santana and Chapman. Veteran pitcher Jerome Williams was designated for assignment late Monday, but Anthony Bass has rejoined the team and is expected to come off the disabled list Tuesday.

Santana, one of four players acquired from the Phillies in the 2011 blockbuster deal that sent Hunter Pence to Philadelphia, was hitting .304 with 13 homers and 51 RBIs through 84 games for the RedHawks. He’s been playing right field. He would be the last of those four players to reach the Majors.

Hernandez went 3-for-5 with a home run and two doubles with a season-high four RBIs on Monday in Oklahoma City’s 10-6 win over Colorado Springs. He’s hitting .337 eight homers and 31 RBIs in 67 games for the RedHawks.

Chapman, who appeared in six games for the Astros earlier this year, has thrown in 26 games for Oklahoma City and has allowed only three earned runs in 28 2/3 innings (0.94 ERA), while striking out 37.

Astros’ statement

The Houston Astros issued the following statement this afternoon:

 “Last month, we were made aware that proprietary information held on Astros’ servers and in Astros’ applications had been illegally obtained. Upon learning of the security breach, we immediately notified MLB security who, in turn, notified the FBI.  Since that time, we have been working closely with MLB security and the FBI to the determine the party, or parties, responsible.  This information was illegally obtained and published, and we intend to prosecute those involved to the fullest extent.

“It is unfortunate and extremely disappointing that an outside source has illegally obtained confidential information.  While it does appear that some of the content released was based on trade conversations, a portion of the material was embellished or completely fabricated.”

Veras joins Astros, Farnsworth outrighted

The Astros called up veteran right-hander Jose Veras from Triple-A Oklahoma City on Thursday and outrighted veteran right-hander Kyle Farnsworth off the active roster.

Farnsworth was signed by the Astros on May 17 and appeared in 16 games, posting a 6.17 ERA in 11 2/3 innings. He started the year with the Mets, who dumped him just a few days prior to him reaching $1 million salary bonus.

Veras played the first half of last season with the Astros before being traded to the Tigers and then signing with the Cubs last winter. He was projected to be the Cubs closer, but he lost that role after compiling an 8.10 ERA in 12 games.

Veras, 33, traded last midseason to Detroit after appearing in 42 games for the Astros and posted a 2.94 ERA with 19 saves in 43 innings. He was a strong presence in the Astros’ young clubhouse, and the team struggled to close out games after he was dealt.

Correa out for season with broken fibula

Astros top prospect Carlos Correa will be out for the rest of the season after undergoing surgery Wednesday to repair a fracture of his fibula just above his right ankle, general manager Jeff Luhnow said.

Correa, the dynamic 19-year-old shortstop taken with the top pick in the 2012 First-Year Player Draft out of Puerto Rico, suffered the injury Saturday night while sliding into third base on an RBI triple playing for Class A Lancaster in Lake Elsinore, Calif.

Luhnow said the surgery, which was arthroscopic, went well and he doesn’t expect there to be any long-term effects.

Correa won’t be able to put any weight on the leg for four weeks and will be in a boot afterwards. It’s unclear when he’ll be able to return to baseball activities, but the team is hopeful he can be available in October to play in the Arizona Fall League or winter ball in November.

“We’ll have to see how the rehab goes,” Luhnow said. “It’s obviously unfortunate. He’s one of our top young players in the game, losing this amount of time, but we are optimistic he’s going to return to 100 percent and will back on the field with us ready to keep doing what he’s doing.”

What Correa was doing was tearing up the Minor Leagues. He was hitting .325 with six homers and 57 RBIs in 62 games for Lancaster, with an on-base percentage of .416 and an OPS of .926, putting him line to be promoted to Double-A Corpus Christi later this year.

It was expected that Correa would come to Spring Training next year competing for a spot on the Major League club.

“I talked to him several times over the past few days and he’s taking it about as well as any young man can take it,” Luhnow said. “It’s the first time he’s been injured. He did a lot of research, we talked to several doctors. His parents are here supporting him and he went into this with a very good attitude. He’s determined to work as hard as he can on his rehab and get back as soon as he can.

“Obviously, we’re going to probably have to slow him down a little bit because we want him to heal as well as he can. And with a player like that, he’s always going to want to push the envelope, so we’re going to have to figure that out. He understands this is the nature of professional baseball and he needs to work twice as hard to get back to where he was.”

Correa played the entire 2013 season at Class A Quad Cities at 18 years old and was impressive. He hit .320 with 33 doubles, nine homers, 86 RBIs and a .405 on-base percentage. Despite being the second-youngest player in the league, he led the Midwest League in OPS (.872), while ranking second in on-base percentage and third in batting average.

Aiken and family arrive in Houston, signing close

California prep left-handed pitcher Brady Aiken, the No. 1 overall pick by the Astros in the First-Year Player Draft, arrived from San Diego on Monday with his parents in preparation for signing a contract with the Astros in the next few days.

Aiken, 17, was taken by the Astros out of Central Catholic High School in San Diego, making him only the third left-handed high school pitcher to be selected with the first overall pick, joining Brien Taylor (Yankees, 1991) and Houston’s David Clyde (Rangers, 1973).

The Astros could announce a deal with Aiken as early as Tuesday.

“It feels great,” Aiken said. “I’m excited. I’m really excited to take this next step in my life.”

MLBPipeline.com’s Jim Callis reported earlier this month the Astros and Aiken had agreed to a $6.5-million signing bonus, which would tie the record for the largest given to a high school pitcher. The Pirates gave Jameson Taillon a $6.5-million signing bonus after taking him with the second pick in 2010.

The slot value for the No. 1 overall pick is $7,922,100.

“It means a lot,” Aiken said. “It means the Astros really invested in me and they’re really looking forward to having me do what I can do for them.”

Aiken arrived with his parents, Linda and Jim Aiken, and his sister, Halle, who plays volleyball at San Diego State.

“We’re very, very excited to be here,” Jim Aiken said. “(Tuesday) is a big day for us. We’re really looking forward to it.”

Aiken posted a 7-0 record and a 1.06 ERA in 11 starts in his senior season. He was a 2014 Perfect Game first team All-American and an All-Region first team in California. He led Team USA to the gold medal at the 18-and-under World Cup in Taiwan last September by winning both of his starts — including a championship-game performance against Japan in which he struck out 10 and allowed one run over seven innings.

Once he officially signs, Aiken will likely be sent to the team’s Spring Training complex in Kissimmee, Fla. He will likely be held to a strict innings limit this summer once his season starts.

“I know all the fans and everyone are looking forward to this and I’m looking forward to it this just as much as they are,” he said. “I’m more excited than they are probably to be honest with you. I’m really excited to see what the future holds.”

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