Results tagged ‘ Felipe Paulino ’

Astros fill infield need, acquire Barmes

 The Astros made their first significant move of the offseason, acquiring infielder Clint Barmes from the Colorado Rockies on Thursday in exchange for right-handed pitcher Felipe Paulino.

Barmes, 31, has appeared in 665 games in his five-plus seasons in the Major Leagues, splitting time mostly between shortstop and second base. He hit .235 in 133 games in 2010 with 21 doubles, eight home runs and 50 RBIs.

Barmes started 69 games at second base and 39 games at shortstop this past season. He started 32 of 33 games at shortstop while Troy Tulowitski was on the 15-day disabled List, hitting .284 in that span with three home runs and 12 RBIs.

Barmes’ most productive season came in 2009 when he hit 23 home runs with 32 doubles and 76 RBI in 154 games as the Rockies everyday second baseman. His home run total ranked third in the NL for second basemen.

One of the goals for Astros general manager Ed Wade this offseason was adding some offensive punch in the middle infield.

“We’re excited to add Clint to our club,” Wade said. “He’s a plus defensive player at two positions, has gap and some home run power and has great makeup. It’s tough to give up a power arm like Felipe’s, but Clint fits a need that we had to address.”

Barmes has a .254 career average in 665 games with 61 home runs and 285 RBIs. He’s appeared in 333 games at shortstop and 306 games at second base. Barmes was the Rockies’ Opening Day shortstop in both 2005 and 2006. In 2009, he became one of just three middle infielders in Rockies history to tally 50-or-more extra-base hits. His 126 RBIs since 2009 rank fourth among NL second basemen.

Paulino, 27, was 1-9 in 19 appearances (14 starts) for the Astros in 2010 with a 5.11 ERA. For his Major League career, all with Houston, he posted a 6-21 mark in 47 appearances with a 5.83 ERA. Paulino had been in the Astros organization since signing as a non-drafted free agent on July 2, 2001.

Astros position breakdown: relief pitching

Here it is: the eighth and final installment of the Astros’ position-by-position breakdown. Today we’ll take a look at relief pitching, which general manager Ed Wade says is one of the strengths of the team. Before we get to the bullpen, here are the links to the previous seven entries in the series (click on the desired position to view the entry): catcher, first base, second base, third base, shortstop, outfield, starting pitcher.

RELIEF PITCHING

2010 bullpen to begin season: Brian Moehler, Jeff Fulchino, Sammy Gervacio, Chris Sampson, Tim Byrdak, Matt Lindstrom and Brandon Lyon.

2010 end-of-season bullpen: Fernando Abad, Tim Byrdak, Gustavo Chacin, Enerio Del Rosario, Jeff Fulchino, Matt Lindstrom, Wilton Lopez, Brandon Lyon, Mark Melancon, Felipe Paulino, Henry Villar and Wesley Wright.

Others who made an appearance: Nelson Figueroa, Brian Moehler, Casey Daigle, Gary Majewski, Kevin Cash.

Combined 2010 stats of Astros relief pitchers: 24-23 record, 45 saves in 60 opportunities, 4.49 ERA (ranked 13th in the NL).

Free agents: None.

Arbitration eligible: LHP Tim Byrdak, LHP Gustavo Chacin, RHP Matt Lindstrom, RHP Felipe Paulino.

What happened: The Astros traded for hard-throwing Matt Lindstrom last December and plunked down $15 million on a three-year contract for Brandon Lyon to bolster the back end of the bullpen after losing both Jose Valverde and LaTroy Hawkins to free agency. Lyon developed a cyst in his shoulder and was behind all spring, opening the door for Lindstrom to win the closer’s job.

Lindstrom got off to a terrific start, posting a 1.40 ERA in his first 19 appearances and going 10-for-10 in save opportunities. He blew three saves and posted a 5.23 ERA in June and began battling back spasms that eventually cost him the closer’s job and forced him to the disabled list in August.  Lyon took over as closer in early August and finished with 20 saves in 22 chances and a 3.12 ERA.

Lindstrom, who led the team with 23 saves, and Lyon became the first set of teammates to save at least 20 games in the same season since the 1992 Cincinnati Reds.

Wilton Lopez, who the Astros acquired on a waiver claim in 2009, took on an important role in the back of the bullpen and wound up pitching in 68 games and posted a 2.96 ERA. The Astros also got good mileage out of lefty Tim Byrdak and right-hander Jeff Fulchino, who battled injuries and wasn’t as sharp as he was in 2009. Fan favorite Chris Sampson had a good first half and was eventually sent to the Minors after some struggles and designated for assignment. Alberto Arias, who was injured in Spring Training, and Sammy Gervacio were quickly shut down because of shoulder troubles.

As the year progressed, the Astros got a good look at right-handers Henry Villar and Mark Melancon, who was acquired from the Yankees in the Lance Berkman trade.

What’s next: Astros general manager Ed Wade doesn’t plan to do much to the bullpen in the offseason and sees it as one of the strengths of the club. Lyon and Lindstrom will once again compete for the closer’s job in the spring, though both could again wind up finishing off games at some point. The Astros like what Lopez brings to the back end of the bullpen and envision Melancon as a future late-game reliever.

Arias, who had surgery for rotator cuff impingement, could be in the picture next year along with Gervacio, who missed most of the year with rotator cuff inflammation. Gervacio had mixed results in the Minors but showed some good flashes with the Minor Leagues. Fernando Abad had a good Major League debut in his 22 appearances and will be a left-handed option, along with Wesley Wright.

Who’s on the farm: Left-hander Douglas Arguello, the pitcher of the year at Double-A Corpus Christi, will be in spring camp next year competing for a job. Abad and Villar, both of whom came up late in the season, could lead the next wave of youngsters in the pen. Don’t forget Chia-Jen Lo, who missed much of last year with a partial tear of his ulnar collateral ligament.

Astros position breakdown: starting pitcher

Here is the second-to-last installment of our Astros’ position-by-position breakdown. The Astros had a decent starting rotation last year, with the ability to be pretty good next season. Here’s a look at the starting staff:

STARTING PITCHING

2010 rotation to begin season: Roy Oswalt, Wandy Rodriguez, Brett Myers, Bud Norris, Felipe Paulino.

2010 end-of-season rotation: Brett Myers, Bud Norris, J.A. Happ, Wandy Rodriguez, Nelson Figueroa.

Others who made a start: Felipe Paulino, Brian Moehler, Wesley Wright, Josh Banks.

Combined 2010 stats of Astros starting pitchers: 52-63, 3.90 ERA (seventh-best in NL), 4 complete games, 2 shutouts, 857 strikeouts (second in NL), 380 walks (most in NL).

Free agents: Brian Moehler.

Arbitration eligible: Wandy Rodriguez, Nelson Figueroa, Felipe Paulino.

What happened: The Astros signed Brett Myers late last winter to help legitimize a rotation that included Roy Oswalt, Wandy Rodriguez, Bud Norris and Felipe Paulino. Oswalt got off to a strong start, but once again suffered poor run support and began grumbling about wanting to be traded, which he eventually was. Rodriguez, coming off a breakout season, stumbled badly out of the gate as the losses piled up for the Astros. Norris got better as the season progressed and finished strong, and Paulino had a brief stretch of dominance before an injury ended his season.

Oswalt made 20 starts with the Astros before being traded and was 6-12, but had a respectable 3.42 ERA. With the team slipping out of contention, he told the Astros in May he wanted to be traded. The club granted his wish in July and sent him to the Phillies in a blockbuster deal in which the team got J.A. Happ in return. Oswalt, who finished one win shy of tying Joe Niekro’s club record, was terrific in Philadelphia, going 7-1 with a 1.74 ERA in 12 starts.

Rodriguez, the team’s Pitcher of the Year in 2009, was terrible to begin the season. He went 3-10 with a 6.09 ERA in his first 14 starts (the team was 4-10 in those starts) before rallying in the second half. He went 8-2 in his final 18 starts and posted a 2.03 ERA, which was the second-best NL in the ERA in that span. He finished the season with 13 consecutive quality starts, the fourth-longest such streak in franchise history, to finish 11-13 with a 3.60 ERA.

Myers, who signed for a one-year deal worth a guaranteed $5.1 million, proved to be one of the best free-agent signings of the season. He went 14-8 with a 3.14 ERA and pitched a career-high 223 2/3 innings, leading the team in wins and ERA by a starter. Myers threw at least six innings in his first 32 starts of the season before coming up one out shy of being able to make it 33-for-33 in his final start of the year. He parlayed the strong season into a three-year contract extension.

Norris, who had only 10 starts under his belt beginning the year, stayed in the rotation all season, missing about a month in June with bursitis and biceps tendinitis. He was 2-7 with a 6.08 ERA in his first 14 starts of the year. He was 7-3 with a 3.84 ERA in his final 14 starts to finish 9-10 with a 4.92 ERA and 158 strikeouts in 153 2/3 innings pitched. He struck out a Minute Maid Park-record 14 against the Pirates on Aug. 14.

Paulino didn’t win a game until his 11th start of the season. He was 0-7 with a 4.40 ERA in his first 10 starts and was the victim of poor run support. He finally broke through June 4 against the Cubs, allowing one run in eight innings. In a five-start stretch from May 19-June 9, he was 1-1 with a 1.75 ERA. Paulino went on the DL on June 21 and missed nearly three months with right shoulder tendinitis. He made five relief appearances in September and wound up finishing 1-9 with a 5.11 ERA in 19 games (14 starts).

Happ, acquired in the Oswalt trade, made 13 starts for the Astros and was 5-4 with a 3.75 ERA. He was winless in his final five starts, going 0-2 with a 4.81 ERA.

The Astros claimed Nelson Figueroa off waivers in the middle of the season and he wound up in the rotation, going 5-3 with a 5.22 ERA in 18 games, including 4-3 with a 3.23 ERA in 10 starts. Veteran Brian Moehler made eight starts for the Astros (and 12 relief appearances) before his season ended in early July with a left groin strain that eventually required surgery. Left-hander Wesley Wright made four starts, and Josh Banks came up from the Minor Leagues to make one start.

What’s next: The Astros are content with the top of their rotation, especially if Myers pitches like he did last season and Rodriguez continues his second-half dominance. Happ is a steady left-hander who should be able to eat up innings and keep the Astros in games if he remains healthy. The Astros were pleased with the progress of Norris and are content with him opening next season as their No. 4 starter.

The biggest question is who’s going to be the fifth starter? Paulino and Figueroa will be given a look, unless the Astros are able to acquire another pitcher in the offseason. The Astros will try to sign a low-cost veteran like they did last offseason with Myers and hope they have similar results. If not, Paulino, Figueroa and prospect Jordan Lyles will battle for a spot in the rotation next spring.

Who’s on the farm: Lyles, the team’s Minor League Pitcher of the Year last season, is only 19 and has a world of potential. He posted a 7-12 record and a 3.57 ERA in 27 games, 26 starts, between the Double-A and Triple-A levels. Lyles spent the majority of his season with Double-A Corpus Christi, posting a 7-9 record and a 3.12 ERA in 21 games, 20 starts. Douglas Arguello (7-5, 2.55 ERA) had a solid season at Double-A Corpus Christi. Kyle Greenwalt (8-7, 5.93 ERA), Brad Dydalewicz (1-6, 11.39 ERA), Dallas Keuchel (5-8, 3.36 ERA) and Ross Seaton (6-13, 6.64 ERA) had varying degrees of success at Double-A. Mike Foltynewicz, a first-round pick this year, and right-hander Tanner Bushue have world of potential, but aren’t quite ready yet.

 

Paulino to DL; Banks up from Round Rock

Astros right-hander Felipe Paulino was placed on the 15-day disabled list Thursday with shoulder tendinitis, general manager Ed Wade said. The Astros purchased the contract of right-hander Josh Banks from Triple-A Round Rock and will start him Saturday against Texas in Arlington.

The move is back-dated to June 21, and he’s eligible to return July 6.

Paulino is 1-8 with a 4.40 ERA in 14 starts this year for the Astros and has had some of the worst run support in the league. He last pitched Sunday against the Rangers, giving up 10 hits, three runs (two earned) and struck out six batters in six innings.

Banks, a non-roster invitee to Spring Training who has spent the entire season at Round Rock, is 8-5 with a 2.97 ERA in 15 starts. In 97 innings, he’s allowed 92 hits, 40 runs (32 earned), 24 walks and struck out 34 batters.

Banks, 27, is 4-7 with a 5.38 ERA in 26 career Major League games with the Blue Jays and Padres, including 18 starts. He appeared in six games for the Padres in 2009, going 1-1 with a 7.15 ERA. The Astros signed him to a Minor League contract on Jan. 8.

 

Paulino has put it all together

I was among those who wanted to see Felipe Paulino out of the rotation after he put up a 5.40 ERA in April and really struggled in some starts. I was tired of hearing about his great stuff and the run support being poor. At some point you just have to win some games.

The Astros preached patience, and they really didn’t have very many other options anyway. They stuck it out with Paulino, and they are looking smarter by the day. He’s put together three solid starts in a row and is pitching with confidence and poise.

On Friday against the Cubs, he gave up five hits and one run in eight innings. He struck out seven and walked one batter unintentionally. Walks have been a problem this year, but he was around the plate all night, throwing 120 pitches (81 strikes).

The Astros’ starting pitching is looking pretty strong. Roy Oswalt has been terrific, Wandy Rodriguez is coming off a solid start, Brett Myers has been consistent and now Paulino is finding his groove. If Bud Norris can get healthy, better days are ahead.

 

Astros lineup Tuesday vs. Brewers

The Astros are 9-6 against teams in their division this year and begin a six-game stretch against NL Central foes tonight when they battle the Brewers at Miller Park in Milwaukee. Felipe Paulino (0-6, 5.36 ERA) will pitch against former Astros lefty Randy Wolf (3-4, 5.10). Wolf is the ninth left-handed starter the Astros have faced this year and the second in a row. Houston is 3-5 against lefty starters.

Paulino is riding a six-game losing streak and is the first Astros pitcher to begin 0-6 since Chris Holt in 1999. His run support average of 2.58 is the fourth-lowest in the Majors this year, and he has the lowest run support in the past two seasons at 2.52. That’s more than a half run lower then the next pitcher on that list, Kenshin Kawakami of Atlanta. The Astros have lost eight of his nine starts.

Here are the lineups:

ASTROS

CF Michael Bourn

2B Jeff Keppinger

1B Lance Berkman

LF Carlos Lee

RF Hunter Pence

2B Pedro Feliz

C Humberto Quintero

SS Tommy Manzella

P Felipe Paulino

BREWERS

2B Rickie Weeks

CF Carlos Gomez

LF Ryan Braun

1B Prince Fielder

3B Casey McGehee

RF Corey Hart

SS Alcides Escobar

C Jonathan Lucroy

P Randy Wolf

Astros need young pitchers to step up

Bud Norris struggled with his control Tuesday against the Reds, walking four batters and hitting one more in six-plus innings of work. He took the loss to fall to 1-2 with a 5.60 ERA through four starts. Right-hander Felipe Paulino will carry an 0-2 record and 5.94 ERA into his fourth start Wednesday against the Reds.

With Roy Oswalt on top of his game, Wandy Rodriguez getting better by the start and Brett Myers pitching in and out of trouble to keep his team competitive nearly every start, the Astros’ chances of staying relevant in the NL Central could fall into the hands of Norris and Paulino.

At this time last year, the Astros had Mike Hampton, Russ Ortiz and Brian Moehler at the bottom of the rotation, so they’re in much better shape with Norris and Paulino. Both of them  have tremendous stuff and the ability to dominate, and their best years are still ahead of them, unlike Hampton and Ortiz.

Norris has just 14 Major League starts under his belt and has been up and down, and Paulino has started only 23 games in his career and this year has pitched better than the numbers have indicated. If this is the year one of them or — dare we say? — both of them figure it all out, the Astros have the makings of a pretty good rotation in the future. Perhaps that future begins Wednesday. 

 

Day 37: Paulino makes a strong case

The Astros were shut down by Florida Marlins starter Ricky Nolasco on Sunday. He retired the first 16 batters he faced and wound up allowing one hit and one walk in 7 1/3 masterful innings in the Marlins’ 4-0 win over the Astros in Jupiter, Fla.

Here’s the breakdown:

The good: Right-hander Felipe Paulino, who’s competing for a spot in the rotation, helped his chances Sunday by holding the Marlins to five hits and four runs (two earned) in 5 2/3 innings in his fourth start of spring. He would have finished the sixth having allowed two runs had shortstop Edwin Maysonet not made a two-out error in the final batter Paulino faced, which led to two unearned runs.

Paulino, 26, went 3-11 with a 6.27 ERA in 23 games (17 starts) for the Astros last season. He stayed in Houston in the offseason to work on his conditioning and opened eyes in camp by posting a 3.78 ERA in 16 2/3 innings covering five starts (six games). He allowed 20 hits, nine walks and struck out 12.

Casey Daigle threw 1 1/3 scoreless innings, allowing three hits, to lower his ERA to 0.77, and Gary Majewski worked a scoreless inning.

Jason Castro threw out Marlins All-Star shortstop Hanley Ramirez trying to steal second base with a terrific throw in the first inning.

The bad: The Astros, who were without Carlos Lee, Hunter Pence or Lance Berkman, were pretty much stuffed by a starting pitcher for the second day in a row. Castro was the first Astros’ base runner to reach when he singled with one out in the sixth inning.

Houston managed only three singles, with Matt Kata and Edwin Maysonet getting the other hits. Maysonet, who started at shortstop and moved to left field, made a throwing error in the sixth that led to a pair of unearned runs that went on Paulino’s line.

What they said: “We’re seeing some different things. We had two pretty long trips back to back here at the end and you put those together with some of the injuries we had… We’re just looking for good, solid at-bats right now, seeing a lot of pitches and doing some things. Yeah, there’s some things we want to adjust and make changes on, but at the same time the guys are doing alright, they’re doing OK.” - manager Brad Mills on the offense.

What’s next: With starting pitchers Brett Myers and Roy Oswalt nursing minor injuries and getting pushed back, left-hander Gustavo Chacin will make his first start of the spring Monday against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Bradenton, Fla., a 12:05 p.m. CT. Chacin, a non-roster invitee who’s a long shot to make the Opening Day roster, has allowed six earned runs and 10 hits in 6 1/3 innings this spring. Brandon Lyon will make his fourth appearance in relief, with bullpen contenders Sammy Gervacio and Wilton Lopez also scheduled to pitch.

Astros-notes

  • 1B Lance Berkman took swings in the batting cage Sunday morning, and Mills said he responded well. No decision has been made about whether Berkman, who had knee surgery two weeks ago, will start the season the disabled list. “That’s always exciting when he starts feeling better, and he was happy about that,” Mills said. “We’re going to see how he feels tomorrow. The first he was back doing all that time in the cage his knee didn’t respond quite so well, so we had to take a day off. The big question tomorrow is going to see how he is. Hopefully, in a day or two we’ll be able to answer that question with a little more certainty.”
  • SS Tommy Manzella, who been out for a week with a strained quadriceps, could play in a Minor League game Monday. Mills said Manzella is responding well going through his drills and expects to be able to write his name in the lineup card soon. “Tommy’s a guy that’s going to give 100 percent when he’s only 80 percent, which sometimes isn’t the best,” Mills said. “We need his body to be 100 percent because he’s going to go full-bore, which is not a bad thing.”
  • Mills said LHP Wandy Rodriguez will pitch Wednesday against the Atlanta Braves and not in a Minor League game. Rodriguez, whose wife is scheduled to give birth to the couple’s second child on Thursday, told reporters Saturday he was going to pitch in a Minor League game on Wednesday, but Mills said he will appear in a Grapefruit League game instead.
  • RHPs Roy Oswalt and Brett Myers, both of whom left their previous starts with injuries, are scheduled to pitch again this spring, Mills said. Myers had a minor left hamstring strain, and Oswalt had a left hamstring strain and will be examined Monday in Houston.  “They want to pitch and they’re scheduled to pitch,” Mills said. “Both of them feel very confident they’re going to b able to throw.”
  • RHP Yorman Bazardo, who hasn’t pitched since March 13, had an MRI on Saturday, the results of which showed no structural damage. He was scheduled to throw lightly off flat ground on Sunday in Kissimmee.

Sunday morning Astros update coming down

The Astros are set to the play the Florida Marlins at 12:05 p.m. today at Roger Dean Stadium in Jupiter, Fla., where rain is moving in. There is definitely enough time to get the game started, but finishing it might be a different story.

Felipe Paulino is starting and scheduled to work about six innings, and Casey Daigle and Gary Majewski will also pitch. All three of these guys are competing for spots on the club on Opening Day and this could be the final chance for them to make an impression, considering manager Brad Mills said many decisions could be made in the next two days.

Here are some other tidbits that were gathered this morning:

  • 1B Lance Berkman took swings in the batting cage Sunday morning, and Mills said he responded well. No decision has been made about whether Berkman, who had knee surgery two weeks ago, will start the season the disabled list. “That’s always exciting when he starts feeling better, and he was happy about that,” Mills said. “We’re going to see how he feels tomorrow. The first time he was back doing all that time in the cage his knee didn’t respond quite so well, so we had to take a day off. The big question tomorrow is going to see how he is. Hopefully, in a day or two we’ll be able to answer that question with a little more certainty.”
  • SS Tommy Manzella, who been out for a week with a strained quadriceps, could play in a Minor League game Monday. Mills said Manzella is responding well going through his drills and expects to be able to write his name in the lineup card soon. “Tommy’s a guy that’s going to give 100 percent when he’s only 80 percent, which sometimes isn’t the best,” Mills said. “We need his body to be 100 percent because he’s going to go full-bore, which is not a bad thing.”
  • Mills said LHP Wandy Rodriguez will pitch Wednesday against the Atlanta Braves and not in a Minor League game. Rodriguez, whose wife is scheduled to give birth to the couple’s second child on Thursday, told reporters Saturday he was going to pitch in a Minor League game on Wednesday, but Mills said he will appear in a Grapefruit League game instead.
  • RHPs Roy Oswalt and Brett Myers, both of whom left their previous starts with injuries, are scheduled to pitch again this spring, Mills said. Myers had a minor groin strain, and Oswalt had a left hamstring strain and will be examined Monday in Houston.  “They want to pitch and they’re scheduled to pitch,” Mills said. “Both of them feel very confident they’re going to b able to throw.”
  • RHP Yorman Bazardo, who hasn’t pitched in more than two weeks because of a shoulder strain, had an MRI on Sunday that revealed no structural damage. Bazardo will continue on his throwing program.

 

Day 32: Great day for the Astros on the field

With 11 players from Minor League camp in uniform, the Astros blasted the Pittsburgh Pirates 11-3 on Tuesday afternoon in Bradenton, Fla. They bashed out 11 hits and got good pitching across the board, including a very strong outing by starter Felipe Paulino.

Here’s the breakdown:

The good: Nothing was more impressive Tuesday than Paulino, who held the Pirates to seven hits (six singles), one walk and one run and struck out six batters in five innings in his longest outing of the spring. He threw 73 pitches, including 50 for strikes, and seemed to put everything together.

He’s been working on all spring with pitching coach Brad Arnsberg on simplifying his mechanics.

“I’m happy because that’s what I was looking for,” Paulino said. “I’ve been trying to battle my mechanics all Spring Training and I’m getting better. All that work I’ve been doing is coming together. At the same time, I’m getting smoother and you what happened. Everything was coming fast out of my hands.”

Houston manager Brad Mills was impressed with how Paulino escaped a jam in the first by striking out Lastings Milledge.

“When he got a couple of runners on, he was able to stop it right away and he did not allow the inning to build and that’s crucial and it was nice to see him get to that stage,” Mills said.

Brandon Lyon, making his second appearance in a Grapefruit League game, threw a crisp 1-2-3 sixth inning and had one strikeout. Mills missed the first half of the spring schedule while recuperating from having a cyst drained in his right shoulder.

“At this time of year, you’re trying to get results and I definitely feel like I have some work to do in a short period of time, but I feel pretty good about it,” he said.

Gary Majewski, a non-roster invitee, threw two scoreless innings in relief and allowed no hits, two walks and struck out two batters to lower his ERA to 7.00.

Offensively, there was plenty of good news to go around. Kat Matsui went 3-for-3 with two runs scored and an RBI and is hitting .306, Jason Michaels went 2-for-3 to improve his average to .310, and Chris Shelton was 3-for-3 with two runs and four RBIs.

Even the Minor Leaguers got in the act. Drew Locke was 2-for-5 and made a terrific catch while flipping over the right-field railing to end the game, and center fielder T.J. Steele was 2-for-5 with two runs scored and an RBI.

The bad: I could nitpick and focus on Kaz Matsui and Minor Leaguer Collin DeLome getting picked off first base, but why spoil an otherwise great day?

What they said“I want opportunities to give wins to the Astros, and at the same time the Astros had confidence in me last year and they waited for me the last two years, and I have to do something better this year for them.” – Paulino.

What’s next: The Astros’ road trip continues Wednesday when they travel to Port St. Lucie to face the New York Mets at 12:10 p.m. CT on MLB.TV. Casey Daigle, a non-roster relief pitcher, will get the start for the Astros, whose rotation got jumbled because of Sunday’s rainout. Outfielders Hunter Pence and Carlos Lee, who didn’t travel with the team to Bradenton on Monday, are scheduled to make the trip to face the Mets. Jeff Fulchino, Matt Lindstrom and Tim Byrdak are also scheduled to throw for Houston.

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