Results tagged ‘ fired ’

Porter, Trembley relieved of duties by Astros

Astros manager Bo Porter and bench coach Dave Trembley were relieved of their duties Monday, the team announced. Tom Lawless was named interim manager through the remainder of the season.

Porter had been the Astros manager since the start of the 2013 season after being named to the position on Sept. 27, 2012 while serving as third base coach for the Washington Nationals. Adam Everett will join the coaching staff, replacing Trembley as bench coach. The remaining coaches will continue in their current roles.

The search for a new manager will begin immediately, the team said in a statement.

The Astros are 59-79 in Porter’s second full season as manager and have already surpassed their win total of their previous three seasons. They went 51-111 last year, finishing with the worst record in baseball for the third year in a row.

Lawless, who has close to 35 years of experience in baseball as a Major League player, Minor League manager and coach, had served as the manager for Triple-A Oklahoma City earlier this season while Tony DeFrancesco was on medical leave before returning to his role as a roving infield instructor.

Everett, who spent parts of 11 seasons in the Majors as a shortstop, including seven with the Astros (2001-07), rejoined the Astros organization as a Minor League infield instructor in 2013.

“Bo’s passion and energy are unparalleled, and his desire to win unquestioned,” Astros general manager Jeff Luhnow said in a statement. “This decision was not made because of our current level of competitiveness in the Major Leagues. I recognize that our win-loss record is largely a product of an organizational strategy for which I am responsible. Rather, I made this decision because I believe we need a new direction in our clubhouse.

“What we will seek going forward is a consistent and united message throughout the entire organization.  It is essential that as an organization we create an atmosphere at the Major League level where our young players can come up and continue to develop and succeed.  Ultimately, I am responsible for creating that culture, and I will do everything in my power to do so—even when it means making difficult moves like the one we made today.

“Moving forward, I am optimistic about the direction of our team.  Our young core continues to progress, and  I believe wholeheartedly that our plan—while at times challenging—is working and will bring a consistent winner to Houston in the very near future.

“We wish Bo and his family well, and feel he will be successful in future endeavors.”

Astros owner Jim Crane said in a statement: “This was not an easy decision to make,” Crane said. “We wish Bo nothing but the best in the future. Jeff has my full support moving forward. Our goal to bring a championship to Houston remains.”     

Geivett in Houston to interview with Astros

Bill Geivett, the senior vice president of scouting and player development/assistant general manager of the Colorado Rockies, arrived in Houston on Friday morning to interview with the Astros for their vacant general manager position.

The Astros are trying to fill their GM spot that became open when Ed Wade was dismissed last week after four-plus years.

“I’m very excited to be here and it’s a great organization and a great city and everybody knows a great state,” Geivett said. “I’m very excited and we’ll see how it goes today.”

Geivett is the first known candidate to come to Houston to interview, though the team has reached out to Tampa Bay Rays executive vice president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman and Texas Rangers assistant general manager Thad Levine, who has since said he will stay with the Rangers.

“It’s a tremendous honor,” Geivett said.

Geivett, 47, oversees both scouting and player development for the Rockies, while also assisting GM Dan O’Dowd with all baseball decisions and evaluations. He joined the Rockies in 2000 and just completed his 11th season with the club and 24th in professional baseball.

The club’s director of player personnel since 2000, Geivett added the role of farm director in 2003. He came to Colorado from the Dodgers where he had worked since September of 1998, most recently as assistant GM (2000).

Geivett is the former special assistant to the GM for the Devil Rays and headed Montreal’s farm system for three years. He broke into the majors with the Yankees as a scout and organizational instructor in 1991. He coached collegiately at Loyola Marymount (1989) and Long Beach State (1990).

New GM will come after Winter Meetings

The Astros won’t have a new general manager in place until after the Winter Meetings, which get underway Monday in Dallas.

Assistant general manager David Gottfried, who has assumed the role of general manager until a full-time replacement can be found, said Monday he was told by team president and CEO George Postolos he would remain as interim GM through at least the Winter Meetings.

“George indicated yesterday it would be through the Winter Meetings, and he didn’t indicate how far beyond and I didn’t ask,” Gottfried said.

The Astros are searching for a new GM after Ed Wade was dismissed following four-plus seasons on the job. New owner Jim Crane and Postolos will have plenty of opportunities to interview potential candidates at the Winter Meetings, when front-office executives from every team will be in attendance.

Postolos, who wasn’t available for comment Monday and hasn’t laid out a timetable for finding a GM, did contact manager Brad Mills to address rumors his job status was in question. Mills is under contract through 2012 with a club option for 2013 and no change is imminent.

“There was some speculation out there [Sunday] night and I think that was all premature and not accurate,” Gottfried said. “George reached out to Millsie personally to make him aware.”

Gottfried, who’s been with the club for 13 years, including five as assistant GM, said the club’s goal remains the same in the wake of the dismissal of Wade and long-time president of baseball operations Tal Smith.

“We’re just going to continue to load up the farm system as best we can,” he said. “Certainly, in all my conversations with George, he wants to get good and stay good for a long time and believes, like many people, the best way to do that is with a strong farm system.”

Wade told last week he wouldn’t return

Former Astros general manager Ed Wade told MLB.com on Monday that he was informed by owner Jim Crane and club president and CEO George Postolos last week that he would not be returning for another season in Houston.

The Astros began a major shake-up of their front office by announcing late Sunday president of baseball operations Tal Smith andWade were being dismissed. The moves come less than a week after a group led by Crane assumed control of the club from long-time owner Drayton McLane and only a week before baseball’s annual Winter Meetings, scheduled to begin next Monday in Dallas

Wade said he was informed in a meeting with Crane and Postolos on Wednesday morning he wasn’t going to be retained, and he left flew to his Philadelphia-area home later that night for a previously scheduled to trip to spend time with his family at Thanksgiving.

“There was really no discussion beyond that beyond timing of announcement,” Wade said. “I did have an opportunity to talk about some of our staff and the esteem I hold them and [manager Brad Mills]. It was a very brief conversation. We’ll move forward from here.”

Wade, who was hired Sept. 20, 2007 to replace Tim Purpura, inherited a team with a barren Minor League system and an owner who would trim payroll over the next few years prior to selling the club. The Astros contended in 2008, going 86-75 and finishing in third place, before slumping to 88 losses in 2009 and 86 in 2010. <p>

The team, which traded away franchise icons Roy Oswalt and Lance Berkman in 2010 and up-and-coming players Hunter Pence and Michael Bourn in 2011, hit rock bottom last season en route to losing a club-record 106 games and having 20 rookies see playing time. <p>

Smith, Wade out in front office shake-up

The Astros began a major shake-up of their front office by announcing late Sunday president of baseball operations Tal Smith and general manager Ed Wade were being dismissed.

The moves come less than a week after a group led by Houston businessman Jim Crane assumed control of the club from long-time owner Drayton McLane and only a week before baseball’s annual Winter Meetings, scheduled to begin next Monday in Dallas.

Crane’s $610 million bid to buy the Astros was approved by Major League Baseball owners Nov. 17, and he told reporters shortly after being approved that significant changes were on the way.

Smith, who just completed his 54th season in baseball and 17th consecutive with the Astros, was a close confidant of McLane and has been a mainstay in the Houston baseball scene for decades. Wade had been on the job with the Astros for four-plus seasons.

In a statement released by the club, team president and CEO George Postolos said assistant general manager David Gottfried will serve as interim general manager, but is not a candidate for the permanent position.

“With the change in ownership, we would like a fresh start in baseball operations,” Postolos said. “We have told Ed Wade and Tal Smith that we are making a change. We recognize their dedication to the Houston Astros. We thank each of them for their significant contributions and many years of service to the Astros, and wish them our very best as they pursue new opportunities.

“The search for a new general manager begins immediately. We are searching for a candidate who has the knowledge, skills and experience to build a winner and a strong commitment to player development in order to sustain success. Our goal is to consistently compete for a championship, and we know the first step towards that goal is to develop one of the top farm systems in baseball. We will hire the best candidate available to achieve our goal.”

Arnsberg not surprised by decision

Astros pitching coach Brad Arnsberg has been relieved of his duties, general manager Ed Wade announced Monday. He will be replaced on an interim basis by former Astros pitcher Doug Brocail.

The decision to let Arnsberg go was made as a result of philosophical differences, according to a release by the club.

When reached by MLB.com on Tuesday, Arnsberg echoed those sentiments.

“It was philosophical differences between a manager and a general manager and a pitching coach,” Arnsberg told MLB.com via phone. “I don’t want to get into the details. It’s just been kind of rearing its ugly head the last 2-3 weeks, and I guess they felt like they had to make a move for the betterment of the club and the staff. I take it like a man.”

Arnsberg said he wasn’t surprised.

“The last couple of weeks have really been a bear for me going to the ballpark,” he said. “I’m always a fun-loving, free-spirited guy and get along with pretty much everybody, and it just hasn’t been a whole lot of fun over the last two, three or four weeks. That’s not why I intended on staying in this game, and so as far as it being a surprise? I’d have to weigh on the side of no, not really.”

Arnsberg said he plans to return to his home in Arlington, Texas, within the 24 hours and looks forward to spending more time with his family. His oldest son, Kyle, was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals last week, and his youngest son, Kaden, is on a summer baseball team.

“I know what I’m going to do when I get home, and that’s become a full-time husband again, which I’m really excited about,” Arnsberg said. “I’m going to be a full-time daddy to a  17-year-old son and get to watch him play a lot of summer league baseball. I’ll just go enjoy my family and become a dad and a husband.”

Arnsberg said he has had an outpouring of support from his players. He talked with Brett Myers on the phone for 15 minutes Tuesday and asked him to talk to some of the players he never got a chance to talk to personally. He said he got a nice text from reliever Brandon Lyon.

“I leave with my head held very, very high,” he said. “I know there’s a majority of the players, and I would say 100 percent of the pitchers, hopefully, that have had a good experience with me as I did them, and I would think they would always have my back no matter what the sitaution.

“The only thing I take credit for is trying to build a family. I know the guys on the pitching staff will have each other’s back.”

Arnsberg had served as the Astros pitching coach since being hired on Oct. 30, 2009 and has been lauded for his work with the pitchers and in the video room. The Astros are second-to-last in the in the NL with a 4.69 ERA.

Brocail, 44, pitched for 15 seasons in the Major Leagues, including four with the Astros. Since retiring after the 2009 season, Brocail has assisted with the evaluation of Major League and Minor League players in the Astros system and has handled some Major League scouting assignments.

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