Results tagged ‘ Jed Lowrie ’

Lowrie awaiting MRI results on thumb

Astros shortstop Jed Lowrie, who sprained his right thumb diving into second base during a pick-off attempt Wednesday, on Thursday was awaiting the results of an MRI he underwent following the game.

Lowrie, who had the thumb heavily wrapped and was wearing a brace, was hoping to be able to play in a few days. He said the thumb was still sore, which was expected.

“Once again, I’m going to assume it’s a few days until they tell me otherwise,” Lowrie said. “Hopefully, with ice and treatment the swelling goes down and maybe we get back in there as soon as possible.”

The injury comes at a terrible time for Lowrie, who was having a great spring and was looking forward to the start of the season in eight days.

“It’s really frustrating, but after that initial frustration wears off then it’s get healthy and get back out there,” he said.

Lowrie sprains his right thumb

Astros shortstop Jed Lowrie suffered a sprained right thumb diving into second base in the third inning of Wednesday’s game against the Marlins at Osceola County Stadium. X-rays were negative.

Lowrie, who has been hampered by injury in his career, led off the third inning with a single and was picked off on a throw from the pitcher. Lowrie dived back into the bag, but jammed his hand into Marlins second baseman Omar Infante, who blocked the base as he reached for the throw.

“Hopefully it’s ice it a couple of days and I’m back out there,” he said. “I’m going to go with that until they tell me otherwise. It’s stupid with five days left in Spring Training. I don’t think there’s any reason to block a base at any time, particularly at this time. I don’t think he’s trying to hurt me, but he’s a middle infielder. Stupid injuries like this happen when you block bases. Hopefully it’s nothing.”

Infante said he wasn’t intentionally blocking the base.

“I could see the throw was away, but I don’t know what happened,” he said. “I feel bad. I couldn’t do anything [to avoid it].”

Said Lowrie:

“The throw kind of took him up the line a little bit and he just blocked the base and I slid right into him and jammed my thumb,” he said. “When you’re expecting the base to be three feet further away and there’s a body there instead, that’s how things get jammed.”

Game 15: Lee, Lowrie break loose

The Astros broke out the big bats, getting the first home runs of the spring from Carlos Lee and Jed Lowrie, to beat the Mets, 9-5, on Sunday and snap a three-game losing streak. Here is the boxscore.

Here is the breakdown:

What went right: The Astros pounced on Mets starter Mike Pelfrey and finished with 12 hits, including eight extra-base hits (six doubles, two home runs). The top of the batting order was especially productive, with Jordan Schafer walking twice and scoring two runs, Jed Lowrie going 2-for-3 with a homer and a double from the left side of the plate, Travis Buck going 3-for-4 with two runs scored and two RBIs and Carlos Lee going 2-for-3 with a double, a home run and five RBIs.

Mills continues to like Lowrie in the No. 2 spot.

“The games he’s hit second, he’s really swung the bat well and that’s nice to see,” he said.

Elsewhere, Brett Wallace was 1-for-1 with an opposite-field double, Scott Moore was 1-for-4 with a double, Jimmy Paredes was 1-for-4 with a run scored and Humberto Quintero, who had been slowed by a bulging disk in his back, made his Grapefruit League debut and went 1-for-3 while catching for five innings.

The Astros turned a pair of double plays, and Paredes stole a base.

On the mound, three relief pitchers combined for four scoreless innings. Enerio Del Rosario allowed one hit in two clean innings, and Brandon Lyon and Fernando Abad enjoyed 1-2-3 frames.

What went wrong: Starting pitcher Livan Hernandez got knocked around a little bit, allowing five hits, four runs and three walks in three innings. He said he felt he was rushing to the plate a little bit and wasn’t too worried, considering he’s got a few more starts left in Florida.

“He just really wasn’t killing himself out there and he went back out for 11 more pitches [in the fourth] and then I went and got him,” manager Brad Mills said.

Fernando Martinez went 0-for-3 with three strikeouts and a walk against his former team, and Matt Downs went 0-for-4 and committed a fielding error while playing second base.

What they said: “I feel comfortable at the plate and I feel I’m in the right position to hit. I’m seeing the ball pretty good, and I’m happy where I am at right now.” — Astros first baseman Carlos Lee on driving in five runs Sunday, including a three-run home run.

What’s next: Right-hander Kyle Weiland, who has allowed no runs and three hits in eight innings this spring, makes the start for the Astros when they travel to Jupiter, Fla., to meet the Miami Marlins at 12:05 p.m. CT. Weiland threw four hitless innings Monday against the Yankees in Tampa and is in the thick of the race for the fifth starter’s spot.

Injury update: CF Jordan Schafer left Sunday’s game in the third inning after spraining his left hand while making a diving catch. He’s listed as day-to-day after X-rays were negative. … LHP Sergio Escalona (elbow inflammation) is available to pitch and could get into a game as early as Monday, but most likely Tuesday. … OF Jack Cust (right elbow tendinitis) played three innings in the outfield in a Minor League game Sunday and threw out a runner, while going 1-for-1 with two walks. Cust has yet to play in the outfield in Grapefruit League play because of the elbow.

Here are some photos:

Jed Lowrie takes a swing in the cage.

Humberto Quintero made his Grapefruit League debut Sunday, going 1-for-3 in five innings.

Carlos Lee waits at the cage, and then drives in five runs.

Mills sporting a black eye and a new watch

The Astros worked out on the stadium field at the Osceola County Stadium complex for the first time Friday morning in anticipation of Saturday’s Grapefruit League opener against the Washington Nationals.

Before the players began to stretch, manager Brad Mills addressed the team and lauded non-roster outfielder Brandon Barnes for presenting him earlier in the morning with a Transformers watch. Mills’ watch was shattered and he suffered a black eye Wednesday when a ball came through the netting behind the cage and struck him.

“That’s pretty good for a young kid to do that,” Mills said. “I told the guys if we screw up on the time today, it’s Brandon’s fault, because of the Transformers watch.”

Here’s the latest on the Astros:

  • LHP Sergio Escalona, who injured his throwing elbow swinging a bat last week, will be shut down for a few days, Mills said. Escalona had an MRI on Thursday, which showed no structural damage.
  • Mills announced the next two starters in his rotation following Livan Hernandez (Saturday), J.A. Happ (Sunday) and Jordan Lyles (Monday).  Wandy Rodriguez will start Tuesday against the Mets, and Bud Norris will start Wednesday against the Phillies in Clearwater.
  • Among the relievers scheduled to pitch behind Hernandez on Saturday are Brett Myers and Brandon Lyon, who will be pitching in a game for the first time since May. Myers will throw one inning in his debut as Astros closer (he won’t pitch the ninth, however).
  • The batting order has yet to be announced, but Mills revealed his starters for Saturday’s game against the Nats: Chris Johnson (third base), Jed Lowrie (shortstop), Jose Altuve (second base), Carlos Lee (first base), J.B. Shuck (left field), Jason Bourgeois (center field), Travis Buck (right field), Castro (catcher) and Jack Cust (DH).
  • Third baseman Jimmy Paredes, who’s nursing a sore left wrist, took batting practice left-handed Thursday, but is still not cleared to swing right from the right side of the plate.
  • Castro, who missed all of last year following knee surgery and then had foot surgery in December, will catch only three innings Saturday. Mills said he’d like Castro to catch three more innings Monday and then perhaps four on Wednesday, depending on how he feels.

Players gather to stretch on the stadium field for the first time

Astros sign Lowrie for $1.15 million

The Astros on Wednesday agreed to terms on a one-year, $1.15 million contract with shortstop Jed Lowrie that includes bonuses and incentives. The Astros were able to avoid the arbitration process with all their eligible players and have everyone under contract for 2012.

Lowrie, acquired along with pitcher Kyle Weiland from the Red Sox in exchange for Mark Melancon in December, hit .252 with six home runs and 36 RBIs in 88 games for Boston last year. He played all four infield positions, starting 46 games at shortstop and 29 at third base.

Lowrie, who had asked for $1.5 million and was offered $900,000 by the Astros, will make his first public appearance with the Astros on Thursday in northwest Houston as part of the team’s winter CAREavan.

“Jed is looking forward to attending the Astros caravan [Thursday], especially having resolved his contractual status and avoiding an arbitration hearing,” said agent Brodie Van Wagenen, co-head of CAA Baseball. “In the end, concessions were made by both parties that allowed a deal to be reached amicably. Jed is in the best shape of his life, ready for Spring Training and excited about suiting up for the Astros, and his relationship with the organization is off to a good start.”

Lowrie has played in parts of four Major League seasons with the Red Sox (2008-11), appearing primarily as a shortstop, which included 130 starts at the position. He is a career .252 hitter with 19 home runs and 117 RBIs. He was drafted by Boston in the first round in 2005.

“The biggest issue with Jed is the amount of time he’s on the field as opposed to the training room and the DL, but there’s nothing about his skill set that would suggest he can’t play an everyday role if he’s healthy,” Astros general manager Jeff Luhnow said. “That’s one of the reasons we traded for him and that’s our expectation and hope.”

He will take over at shortstop for Clint Barmes, who wasn’t re-signed by the team after one year in a Houston uniform.

Luhnow’s first trade is a good one

Less than a week after being introduced as general manager of the Astros, Jeff Luhnow put his first major imprints on the club when he acquired Red Sox shortstop Jed Lowrie and pitcher Kyle Weiland in exchange for closer Mark Melancon.

“For me, it’s the classic win-win trade,” Luhnow said. “Boston had the need for a bullpen arm. We’re going to suffer a loss in our bullpen by not having Melancon there for us, but what we’re able to get back is a guy who can play a premium position and who has had success with the bat and who has done a lot of good things. To add on top of that a young pitcher capable of being a starting pitcher in the big leagues, we felt this is an opportunity to take advantage of.”

I’m never one to judge trades until you get a better idea of how the players will perform in their new uniforms, but at first glance this appears to be a good deal for both sides. But, in this space, let’s focus on the Astros.

The Astros needed a shortstop after losing Clint Barmes and they got one in the hard-nosed Lowrie, who could probably use a fresh start. He’s a switch-hitter who’s under club control for three more years, so he fits into what the Astros are doing. You can bet Astros manager Brad Mills gave his endorsement of Lowrie, considering he was his bench coach in Boston for two years.

Sure, the Astros had internal candidates to play shortstop from a group including Angel Sanchez, Diory Hernandez, Rule 5 pick-up Marwin Gonzalez and non-roster invitee Brian Bixler, but Lowrie is a better option to be the everyday man at shortstop.

Lowrie, 27, has played a part-time role with the Red Sox since 2008, appearing a career-high 88 games last season and hitting .252/.303/.382. He had his best year in 2010 when he hit .287/.381/.526 with nine homers and 24 RBIs, but he was limited to 171 at-bats. He’s a career .214 hitter with a .293 on-base percentage as a left-hander and a .326 hitter with a .385 on-base percentage as a right-hander.

Weiland, a 25-year-old right-hander who went to Notre Dame, made a steady rise through Boston’s system after being drafted in the third round in 2008. He got his feet wet in the Majors last season, but there’s no reason to believe he can’t come to Astros camp and compete for a spot in the rotation. He throws in the low 90′s with his fastball, but can hit 95 mph and has good sink, according to scouting reports. He was a closer at Notre Dame, but appears to have a future in the rotation.

The Astros will miss Melancon, who went 8-4 with a 2.78 ERA and 20 saves in his first full season in the Majors last year. He moved into the closer’s role when Brandon Lyon went down for the season with an injury and he appears to have a bright future, but the Astros have a growing crop of young bullpen arms, including Rule 5 pick-up Rhiner Cruz and David Carpenter, who made his debut last year. Lyon will return healthy next year and could close in the final year of his contract.

Plus, the Astros are unlikely to contend next year, so having a lights-out closer isn’t tantamount. Expect the club to get a good look next year at several arms they believe could close in the future.

The bottom line is the Astros traded one young player and received two more in return. The rebuilding continues.

Let’s take a stab at what the Astros’ Opening Day lineup could look like:

CF Jordan Schafer (L)

2B Jose Altuve (R)

LF J.D. Martinez (R)

1B Carlos Lee (R)

RF Brian Bogusevic (L)

3B Jimmy Paredes (S)

SS Jed Lowrie (S)

C Jason Castro (L)

Report: Astros acquire Lowrie, pitcher from Red Sox for Melancon

Astros general manager Jeff Luhnow made his first significant player move Wednesday, acquiring infielder Jed Lowrie and pitcher Kyle Weiland from the Red Sox in exchange for reliever Mark Melancon, according Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com.

The Astros couldn’t be reached to confirm the deal.

The Astros acquired Melancon from the Yankees at the Trade Deadline in 2010 as part of the Lance Berkman deal.

Lowrie, a 27-year-old switch-hitter, would satisfy the Astros’ need for a shortstop following the departure of Clint Barmes in free agency. He’s a career .252 hitter with 19 homers and 117 RBIs in 256 games with the Red Sox since 2008, and he batted .252 with six homers and 36 RBIs last season.

Weiland, 25, is a right-hander who made his Major League debut last season and was 0-3 with a 7.66 ERA in seven games (five starts). A third-round pick of the 2008 Draft, he went 23-31 with a 3.51 ERA in 90 career games in the Minor Leagues, including 85 starts.

Melancon, 26, could fill the Red Sox’s need for a closer. He pitched in a career-high 71 games for the Astros last season and was 8-4 with a 2.78 ERA and saved 20 games. He took over as closer in the first half of the season after Brandon Lyon went down with an arm injury.

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